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Single European Sky

For more information on this topic please see:

  • October 2011

    Air traffic control in Europe: Enormous challenges for the future

    The Single European Sky is Europe’s most important project in aviation policy.  The goals are to increase timeliness and reduce carbon emissions through direct flight routes and greater cost efficiency.  Yet implementation continues to drag on; member states have fallen far behind the targets they set for themselves.

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    Comparision EU-USA
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    FABs
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    Detour
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  • July 2011

    Setting the course: EU aviation must remain competitive

    The pressure from competition in global aviation continues to grow. To be able to compete in the global marketplace, European airlines need markedly better framework conditions. On issues such as the Single European Sky, ground services, or slot allocation, the EU and member states must in the coming months take decisions that will set the direction for the future of EU aviation.

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    Single european sky
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    Cost efficiency
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    Consumer protection
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    Air transport
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  • April 2011

    Single European Sky: More air traffic - fewer emissions

    Minus 10 percent emissions, plus 300 percent capacities - those are convincing arguments to finally implement the Single European Sky and to equip air traffic management with cutting-edge technology. Policy makers are called on to advance Europe's most important transport and climate policy endeavour - and to ensure a fair burden-sharing.

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    Strong partner
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  • December 2010

    Good things come to those who wait, and wait, and wait ”¦

    European air traffic management is being freed too slowly from the straightjacket of national competences. Year over year, this is costing billions of euros and millions of tonnes of avoidable carbon emissions.

    The article in a PDF format
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  • July 2010

    Volcanic ash cloud: Lessons learned?

    Security enjoys top priority in aviation. Yet the authorities utterly overestimated the risks stemming from the volcanic ash cloud, resulting in GDP losses totalling in the billions. The EU and nation-states are urgently called on to revamp crisis management provisions.

    The article in a PDF format
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    Europe deep in the red
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  • March 2010

    Pressing ahead with Single European Sky despite opposition

    French air traffic controllers are staging opposition to a Single European Sky. On February 23, they began a strike lasting several days against plans to merge the air traffic control services of six European countries – France, Germany, Switzerland, and the Benelux countries – into what has been dubbed a functional airspace block, a cornerstone of the Single European Sky.

    The article in a PDF format
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  • December 2008

    Single European Sky: Declaration of intent must be followed by action

    By 2012, EU air navigation services are to operate on the basis of nine airspace blocks. So far, the participating countries have signed an as yet nonbinding declaration of intent in November 2008 for merely one single block. Much remains to be done to finally breathe life into the Single European Sky following decades of discussion.

    FABEC – Heart of EU Aviation
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    The article in a PDF format
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  • September 2008

    Single European Sky: Achieving breakthrough on second attempt

    The EU member states must end their delay tactics in the reorganisation of European air navigation services. The proposals of the EU Commission must be approved by the end of 2008. Otherwise, the detours airlines are compelled to fly will continuing producing roughly 16 million tonnes of carbon emissions annually.

    Costly patronageDiagram: JPEG
    The article in a PDF format
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  • February 2008

    Single European Sky: EU member states called to task

    The EU Commission put it succinctly: Implementing the urgently needed Single European Sky represents a technical challenge: “The actual hurdle, however, is of a political nature.” While the Schengen Agreement has made possible a Europe without borders on the ground, the member states have for years been able to assert their national interests in the sky over the EU. Creation of a competitive, uniform EU air traffic control system remains a distant dream.

    The article in a PDF format
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  • October 2007

    EU air traffic control: Regulatory framework urgently needs to be improved

    The fragmentation of air traffic control in Europe costs 3.5 billion euros annually and harms the environment, resulting in a wasteful use of EU airspace. A true Single European Sky could reduce carbon emissions by up to 12 percent. An EU expert group has now presented important recommendations – we’ll give you an overview.

    Fragmented European SkyDiagram: Powerpoint | JPEG
    The article in a PDF format
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  • July 2007

    CO2: Air transport conserving fuel and reducing emissions

    Lufthansa is exhausting all options to conserve fuel, both for environmental and economic reasons. Steadily falling CO2 emissions are the result. And the airline is not alone in its efforts: Giovanni Bisignani, Director General of the airline association IATA, hopes to achieve a green airline industry with zero emissions by 2050.

    Kerosene consumption and CO2 outputDiagram: Powerpoint | JPEG
    Greenhouse gas emissions by areaDiagram: Powerpoint | JPEG
    The article in a PDF format
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  • June 2007

    Climate protection: A global challenge

    EU partial solutions are useless in effectively advancing climate protection. For example, the issue of emissions trading must be addressed globally. Only in this way can non-EU partners be included in the solution. Lufthansa is meanwhile investing billions in fuel-efficient aircraft – and the list of tasks for policy makers has been set out.

    It pays to invest in cutting-edge technologyDiagram: Powerpoint | JPEG
    The article in a PDF format
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  • December 2006

    Climate protection: Single European Sky more effective than Emissions Trading

    European aviation could avoid 8-12 percent of its CO2 emissions in the near future. How? By finally giving the Single European Sky an effective structure. Instead, European politicians are continuing their preparations to include civil aviation in an isolated Emissions Trading System. Why expand bureaucracy yet again when the Single European Sky would lead to significant cuts in emissions in the short-term?


    The patchwork of European air spaceDiagram: Powerpoint | JPEG
    The article in a PDF format
    Click here to download.

  • July 2006

    Climate protection in civil aviation: Market economy instead of regulation

    By continuously investing in state-of-the-art aircraft, Lufthansa has cut its kerosene consumption per passenger by 30 percent since 1990 – now, additional regulations and burdens on airlines threaten the very efficiency that is so decisive for climate protection.


    Investments in state-of-the-art technology pay offDiagram: Powerpoint | JPEG
    The July 2006 edition in a PDF format (624 KB)
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  • June 2005

    Common Framework for Fair Competition

    EU airlines call for further-reaching liberalization, borderless airspace and lower costs

    Number of factors
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    Airlines earn the lowest profits in the air transportation industry
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    Insurance premiums for airlines are substantially higher in Germany than in the U.S.
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    The June 2005 edition in a PDF format (544 KB)
    Click here to download.

  • June 2005

    Innovation Instead of Activism

    Rolling back subsidies and implementing the Single European Sky will reduce emissions most efficiently


    Lufthansa supports the EU research project CARIBIC.
    Diagram: Powerpoint | JPEG
    The June 2005 edition in a PDF format (544 KB)
    Click here to download.

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